Push The Moon- Qigong/Medical Qigong/Reiki/Yoga - Brian M. Dotson,  MQT, KRMT, RYT 200
Om, primordial sound of the universe, sanskrit
The Eight Limbs of Yoga
  • refers to the five observances
  • : Discipline of the body: rules and postures to keep it disease-free and for preserving vital energy. Correct postures are a physical aid to meditation, for they control the limbs and nervous system and prevent them from producing disturbances.
  • : control of breath. Beneficial to health, steadies the body and is highly conducive to the concentration of the mind.
  • : withdrawal of senses from their external objects.
The last three levels are called internal aids to Yoga (antaranga sadhana)

  • : concentration of the citta upon a physical object, such as a flame of a lamp, the mid point of the eyebrows, or the image of a deity.
  • : steadfast meditation. Undisturbed flow of thought around the object of meditation (pratyayaikatanata). The act of meditation and the object of meditation remain distinct and separate.
  • : oneness with the object of meditation. There is no distinction between act of meditation and the object of meditation. Samadhi is of two kinds:
    • Samprajnata Samadhi conscious samadhi. The mind remains concentrated (ekagra) on the object of meditation, therefore the consciousness of the object of meditation persists. Mental modifications arise only in respect of this object of meditation.
      This state is of four kinds:
      • : the Citta is concentrated upon a gross object of meditation such as a flame of a lamp, the tip of the nose, or the image of a deity.
      • : the Citta is concentrated upon a subtle object of meditation , such as the
      • : the Citta is concentrated upon a still subtler object of meditation, like the senses.
      • Sasmita: the Citta is concentrated upon the ego-substance with which the self is generally identified.
    • Asamprajnata Samadhi supraconscious. The citta and the object of meditation are fused together. The consciousness of the object of meditation is transcended. All mental modifications are checked (niruddha), although latent impressions may continue.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Noble Eightfold Path (Pāli: ariyo aṭṭhaṅgiko maggo, Sanskrit: āryāṣṭāṅgamārga, Sinhala: ආර්ය අශ්ටාංගික මාර්ග), is one of the principal teachings of the Buddha, who described it as the way leading to the cessation of suffering (dukkha) and the achievement of self-awakening. It is used to develop insight into the true nature of phenomena (or reality) and to eradicate greed, hatred, and delusion. The Noble Eightfold Path is the fourth of the Buddha's Four Noble Truths; the first element of the Noble Eightfold Path is, in turn, an understanding of the Four Noble Truths. It is also known as the Middle Path or Middle Way.
All eight elements of the Path begin with the word "right", which translates the word samyañc (in Sanskrit) or sammā (in Pāli). These denote completion, togetherness, and coherence, and can also suggest the senses of "perfect" or "ideal".
In Buddhist symbolism, the Noble Eightfold Path is often represented by means of the dharma wheel (dharmachakra), whose eight spokes represent the eight elements of the path.
 
 
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